Electrical Principles

The most useful form of electricity is direct current, which is what comes from a battery.  Electronic circuits need DC.  However DC is not very easy to transfer through long distances.  AC is, because the transformers that step up and step down the voltage for transmission can only work an alternating current.  The problem is that AC does not behave in quite the same way as DC, and there are extra things that need to be taken into consideration.  You will find out about these on these pages.

 

These pages are based on a Level 3 course that I developed for Access Level 3 Students at Leeds City College.  However they will suit first year university students who will have only come across the most basic AC Theory. 

 

Much of the content was based on Electrical Circuit Theory and Technology by John Bird (published by Routledge, ISBN 978-1-85617-770-2)

Tutorial 1

Basic Alternating Currents

Tutorial 1

Tutorial 2

Simple Waveforms

Tutorial 2

Tutorial 3

Sinusoidal Quantities

Tutorial 3

Tutorial 4

Capacitors in AC Circuits

Tutorial 4

Tutorial 5

Inductors in AC Circuits

Tutorial 5

Tutorial 6

Power in AC Circuits

Tutorial 6

Tutorial 7

Kirchhoff's Laws and Circuit Analysis

Tutorial 7

Tutorial 8

Thvinin's Theorem and Norton's Theorem

Tutorial 8

Tutorial 9

Power Transfer and Load Matching

Tutorial 9

Tutorial 10

Transformers

Tutorial 10

Tutorial 11

Series AC Circuits and Series Resonance

Tutorial 11

Tutorial 12

Parallel AC Circuits and Parallel Resonance

Tutorial 12

Tutorial 13

Three Phase AC

Tutorial 13

Tutorial 14

Capacitor Transients

Tutorial 14

Tutorial 15

Inductor Transients

Tutorial 15

Examinations

Tutorials 1 - 5

Answers

Tutorials 6 - 15

Answers

 

Schemes of Work

Semester 1 Semester 2  
Home Links Symbols Data Sheet